Dami Ajayi’s Clinical Blues shortlisted for the Wole Soyinka’s prize for literature

Dami Ajayi’s collection of poems, Clinical Blues has been shortlisted for the Wole Soyinka prize for literature. The poet Dami Ajayi took to his facebook page to share his surprise.

Below is an extract of the post:

Writer’s Bio


Dami Ajayi is a Nigerian poet. He studied medicine at Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife. He is also the author of A Woman’s Body is a Country

Femi Morgan’s Review of Nnaemeka Oruh’s In Memoriam of a Modest Shame

Nnaemeka Oruh’s work is awesome poetry. His collection does not try to impress with high-faluting words and forceful imageries. In the stead of forceful verses, Nnaemeka uses satire, employs relatable and historically relevant imageries, starts a conversation with sarcasm and satire. Opening up fresh perspectives without forcing the interpretations on the reader. A bold voice calling Okot P’ Bitek and 2Pac Shakur once in a while, without forgetting that this is the age of ‘shaku shaku’.

In Rasaq Malik Gbolahan’s review of the book, I came to realise the reiteration of the limitations of the first published work. Nevertheless, a writer must boldly open him or herself for the step of contributing his voice to social and creative discourse with a personal signature. This can only be done by venturing into the space of the pantheons by publishing, improving oneself for the next collection, the book of short stories, the novel, the documentary.

This is why I welcome critics, they open new vistas of ideas to the writer and creative, they force the writer to improve and with the knowing that someone critical is looking over your shoulders to praise, lampoon, or disgrace your craft, you become far more prepared, and conscious of your craft.

#InMemoriamofaModestShame #Poetry #NewVoice #Writer #BaronsCafe

Writer’s Bio

Femi Morgan is a publisher at Baron’s Cafe

In a Confrontational Tone, Writer Calls for Translation of Season of Crimson Blossoms

In a confrontational tone, Femi Morgan challenged Abubakar Adam Ibrahim whose book won the 2016 Nigerian Prize for Literature to produce an Hausa translation of his Season of Crimson Blossoms.

Your book will be like a distant legend sought after by its owners with the owners who will keep struggling to have a glimpse of its narrative and thematic glory”

These are parts of comments made by a Femi Morgan through his Facebook platform on a review of Abubakar Adam Ibrahim’s Season of Crimson Blossoms
In a confrontational tone, he challenged Abubakar Adam Ibrahim whose book won the 2016 Nigerian Prize for Literature to produce an Hausa translation of his Season of Crimson Blossoms. Femi Morgan urged him to translate his book to Hausa language noting that failure to produce a translation would be to the exclusion of the people the book is about.
Below is an extract of the post:

MY THOUGHTS ON READING UZODINMA IWEALA’S SPEAK NO EVIL- Tochukwu Emmanuel Okafor

The storyline is very familiar — in a good way. The prose is immediate, well-written (So many beautiful sentences in here!) I see another motion picture emerging from Iweala’s new novel.

And God was always right; so I decided I would only like girls even if I could feel that I liked looking at them less than I should. I didn’t watch the porn my classmates shared on their phones in the hallways before class or sitting on the lawn in front of the Cathedral. At home, I would watch women with women and men with women on my phone, trying only to focus on the women as I touched myself. But those men, their bodies, their sounds. I wanted to gouge out my eyes. Sometimes I asked God for deliverance. Sometimes I held my own breath and circled my hands around my throat and squeezed until they grew tired and I coughed saliva over my lips and onto my chin. Sometimes I cried. When my mother asked me what was wrong I said homework. She never probed any further. Sometimes when Meredith touched me, when she circled her arms around my neck or pinched my butt, I felt something, but never very strong or for very long.

Uzodinma Iweala- Speak No Evil

With his masterpiece, “All our Lives”, Tochukwu Emmanuel Okafor became  the first male and first Nigerian to win the  2017/2018  Short Story Day Africa Prize. Below are his thoughts on Uzodinma Iweala’s Speak no Evil:

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WHAT I THINK ABOUT CHINUA ACHEBE’S THERE WAS A COUNTRY: A PERSONAL HISTORY OF BIAFRA -George O. Victor

Dad refused to tell me about the Nigerian Civil war. Achebe writes about the pain and anguish of those three years

Decades ago, in our small apartment in Agbado area of Lagos where I grew up in a family of full-blown Yoruba people, adjacent my parent’s room, was a two feet shelf that contained memorabilia from Biafra. I remember the Biafra coins and currency notes, receipts and moth eaten photographs that lay in a black paper satchel on the shelf.

At a time when we eventually had to move down to Àkúré, into our very own bungalow, the shelf was burnt along with the satchel. Dad never told me anything about the war or the experiences at the time.

Continue reading “WHAT I THINK ABOUT CHINUA ACHEBE’S THERE WAS A COUNTRY: A PERSONAL HISTORY OF BIAFRA -George O. Victor”