Femi Morgan’s Review of Nnaemeka Oruh’s In Memoriam of a Modest Shame

Nnaemeka Oruh’s work is awesome poetry. His collection does not try to impress with high-faluting words and forceful imageries. In the stead of forceful verses, Nnaemeka uses satire, employs relatable and historically relevant imageries, starts a conversation with sarcasm and satire. Opening up fresh perspectives without forcing the interpretations on the reader. A bold voice calling Okot P’ Bitek and 2Pac Shakur once in a while, without forgetting that this is the age of ‘shaku shaku’.

In Rasaq Malik Gbolahan’s review of the book, I came to realise the reiteration of the limitations of the first published work. Nevertheless, a writer must boldly open him or herself for the step of contributing his voice to social and creative discourse with a personal signature. This can only be done by venturing into the space of the pantheons by publishing, improving oneself for the next collection, the book of short stories, the novel, the documentary.

This is why I welcome critics, they open new vistas of ideas to the writer and creative, they force the writer to improve and with the knowing that someone critical is looking over your shoulders to praise, lampoon, or disgrace your craft, you become far more prepared, and conscious of your craft.

#InMemoriamofaModestShame #Poetry #NewVoice #Writer #BaronsCafe

Writer’s Bio

Femi Morgan is a publisher at Baron’s Cafe

Author: Damilola Oyeleye

Oyeleye Damilola holds a B.A. in English from Adekunle Ajasin University. She is a book lover, movie addict, gifted napper and has a secret obsession for all things thrilling.