MY THOUGHTS ON READING UZODINMA IWEALA’S SPEAK NO EVIL- Tochukwu Emmanuel Okafor

The storyline is very familiar — in a good way. The prose is immediate, well-written (So many beautiful sentences in here!) I see another motion picture emerging from Iweala’s new novel.

And God was always right; so I decided I would only like girls even if I could feel that I liked looking at them less than I should. I didn’t watch the porn my classmates shared on their phones in the hallways before class or sitting on the lawn in front of the Cathedral. At home, I would watch women with women and men with women on my phone, trying only to focus on the women as I touched myself. But those men, their bodies, their sounds. I wanted to gouge out my eyes. Sometimes I asked God for deliverance. Sometimes I held my own breath and circled my hands around my throat and squeezed until they grew tired and I coughed saliva over my lips and onto my chin. Sometimes I cried. When my mother asked me what was wrong I said homework. She never probed any further. Sometimes when Meredith touched me, when she circled her arms around my neck or pinched my butt, I felt something, but never very strong or for very long.

Uzodinma Iweala- Speak No Evil

With his masterpiece, “All our Lives”, Tochukwu Emmanuel Okafor became  the first male and first Nigerian to win the  2017/2018  Short Story Day Africa Prize. Below are his thoughts on Uzodinma Iweala’s Speak no Evil:

Finished this book in three sittings. The storyline is very familiar — in a good way. The prose is immediate, well-written (So many beautiful sentences in here!) I see another motion picture emerging from Iweala’s new novel. However, at first, I didn’t seem to grasp the dialogue style. But it soon played into my hands, made me live in each character’s head at the same time. And the ending, oh the ending 

You can purchase a copy of the book on Amazon